How will Google's Insecure Website Warning Effect you

With the release of Chrome v62 Google have begun marking non-HTTPS pages that contain password and credit card form input fields as 'NOT SECURE' in the address bar and will soon be broadening the criteria to opt in forms etc.

How will Google's Insecure Website Warning Effect you

With the release of Chrome v62 Google have begun marking non-HTTPS pages that contain password and credit card form input fields as 'NOT SECURE' in the address bar and will soon be broadening the criteria to opt in forms etc.

Webmaster who's sites will be effected have been getting emailed by Google for a few months now so nobody with an effected website can claim that they where not aware of the situation. Websites that are not affected will not have had an email from Google.

Regardless of what many scaremongers and unscrupulous web hosting companies are spreading this Google update will not effect websites that do not request passwords or credit numbers so if you are a local tradesman for example with small website advertising your business or services and you do not collect online payments or request that people log in with a password then this has no bearing on you whatsoever. Do not believe the people say that all website regardless of their content are effected

Even if your website triggers a false warning - like we have manage to trigger with this article - visitors are not entering credit card information and are not logging in so whether the site is showing as secure or not has no relevance whatsoever, I mean you're reading this article aren't you?

Unfortunately, reports have been flooding in recently from people claiming that their hosting company or web designer has told them that they must now switch to SSL regardless of whether they sell online or have secure member pages requiring passwords with some "dodgy" companies and individuals demanding between £80 and £300 PA for a SSL certificates and telling customers that if they don't pay, their website will be useless with some even threatening to disable the hosting "for security reasons" if the SSL payment isn't made.

What you have here are resellers - companies and individuals reselling hosting for large hosting companies under a white label set up - simply taking advantage of Google's announcement and trying to cash in. Do you really need SSL?

Genuine SSL certificates can be purchase for around £50 per year and come with full liability protection too, these are ideal for online stores and companies taking payment via their website, however if you do not take payments and simply wish to serve your pages via HTTPS to avoid a Google warning then there are a number of FREE options.

With companies like Let’s Encrypt and SmartSSL, free SSL options are popping up across the internet. They're quick, they're convenient, and they're appealing to bloggers and other web users who typically don't process payments online.

So whether you find yourself effected of not and simple wish to upgrade to SSL and serve your pages via HTTPS there are a number of cheap and free options available.

If you are with a hosting company or a web designer who is misinforming you and demanding payment then it's probably a good idea to move and have nothing more to do with them.



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